From Blighty to Baghdad

The Genealogy of the Smith/Lincoln Family

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A plan of the establishment at Point Puer.
A plan of the establishment at Point Puer.
Point Puer operated from 1834 to 1848 on the Tasman Peninsula, the first British purpose-built reforming institution for criminal boys. It predated Parkhurst Prison on the Isle of Wight by four years and was initiated by Lt-Governor Arthur at a time when children were being seen in their own terms, rather than as small adults. The objective of making constructive colonial citizens out of transported teenagers was to be achieved by separation from adult convicts, with education, trade training and religious instruction being the vehicles to change immoral habits.

A combination of management and resourcing issues, together with the defiant culture of many boys, resulted in the establishment producing mixed results. While some boys continued to offend as adults, others used their trades and pursued honest and successful lives.  
 
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Alice Marsh
Alice Marsh
 
 
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Allan Eagles
Allan Eagles
 
 
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Alma Parker
Alma Parker
 
 
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Annie Benson
Annie Benson
 
 
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Arnold Humphries
Arnold Humphries
 
 
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Bedelia Lord nee Bree
Bedelia Lord nee Bree
 
 
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Beryl Crane
Beryl Crane
 
 
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Betty Porter
Betty Porter
 
 
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Bradley's Brewery, Goulburn, New South Wales
Bradley's Brewery, Goulburn, New South Wales
 
 
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Bradley's Brewery, Goulburn, New South Wales
Bradley's Brewery, Goulburn, New South Wales
 
 
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Catherine Capel
Catherine Capel
 
 
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Catherine Maloney
Catherine Maloney
 
 
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Charles Goatley
Charles Goatley
 
 
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Charles Lincoln
Charles Lincoln
 
 
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Chris Knott
(At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.) 
 
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Clair Hargreaves
Clair Hargreaves
 
 
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Clifford Kentwell
Clifford Kentwell
 
 
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Clyde 'Boss' Stewart
Clyde "Boss" Stewart
 
 
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Convict
Convict
 
 
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Daniel Lane
Daniel Lane
 
 
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Delia Lord
Delia Lord
 
 
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Doris Lincoln nee Day
Doris Lincoln nee Day
 
 
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Dorothy Belcher
Dorothy Belcher
 
 
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Edwin Parker
Edwin Parker
 
 
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Edwin Parker
Edwin Parker
 
 
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Elaine Jones
Elaine Jones
 
 
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Elizabeth Broderick
Elizabeth Broderick
 
 
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Elizabeth Capel
Elizabeth Capel
 
 
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Elizabeth Olga Nevile
Elizabeth Olga Nevile
 
 
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Elizabeth Peck
Elizabeth Peck
 
 
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Emma Hargreaves
Emma Hargreaves
 
 
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Female Child Death
Female Child Death
 
 
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Florence Jones nee Stewart
Florence Jones nee Stewart
 
 
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Florence Osmond
Florence Osmond
 
 
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Frederick Baker
Frederick Baker
 
 
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George Osmond
George Osmond
 
 
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Gladys Davis nee Parker
Gladys Davis nee Parker
 
 
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Grahame Smith
(At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.) 
 
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Harry Wright
Harry Wright
 
 
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Heather Lomas nee Smith
(At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.) 
 
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Hector Lord
Hector Lord
 
 
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Helen Osmond
Helen Osmond
 
 
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Henry Hargreaves
Henry Hargreaves
 
 
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Herbert William Harley
Herbert William Harley
 
 
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HMS Euryalus
HMS Euryalus
HMS Euryalus was a Royal Navy 36-gun Apollo-class frigate, which saw service in the Battle of Trafalgar and the War of 1812. After the end of the Napoleonic Wars she continued on active service for a number of years, before spending more than two decades as a prison hulk. The Euryalus was moored at Chatham and became a hulk solely for young boys. Here the regime was especially severe. Boys were kept below deck for 23 hours a day and forced to do manual labour. They lived in constant fear of physical abuse from the guards and a culture of gang violence was embedded. Euryalus ended her career in Gibraltar where, in 1860, she was sold for breaking up. 
 
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Horsemonger Lane Gaol
Horsemonger Lane Gaol
Constructed between 1791 and 1799 to a design by George Gwilt the Elder, architect surveyor to the county of Surrey, this was once the largest prison in the county, and was adjacent to Sessions House, a court building also designed by Gwilt. Horsemonger Lane remained Surrey’s principal prison and place of execution up to its closure in 1878. It was a common gaol, housing both debtors and criminals, with a capacity of around 300 inmates. In total, 131 men and four women were executed there between 1800 and 1877, the gallows being erected on the flat roof of the prison's gatehouse. The gaol was demolished in 1881 and the site is today a public park, Newington Gardens. 
 
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Hugh Marsh
Hugh Marsh
 
 
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Infant boy death
Infant boy death
 
 
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Infant Girl Death
Infant Girl Death
 
 

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